Childrení Skepticism Toward Television Advertising-Edición Única

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11285/572606
Title:
Childrení Skepticism Toward Television Advertising-Edición Única
Issue Date:
2004-08-01
Abstract:
The aims of this work were to explore whether children exhibit skepticism toward televsion advertising and to examine the possible influence of socialization agents such as family, peers, and media on children's skepticism toward television advertising using socialization theory as a framework. Skepticism was defined as a tendency to disbelieve advertising claims. Advertising skepticism was conceptualized as an outcome of a socialization process. Specifically, the study investigated whether children from 8 to 12 years of age exhibit skepticism toward advertisng. Additionally, parents' skepticism, the type of family communication (socio-oriented versus concept-oriented communication), children's susceptibility to peer influence (susceptibility to informational versus normative peer influence), and the extent of television viewing were investigated regarding the relationship to children's skepticism toward television advertising. In order to shed light on the relationship among these variables, children's market knowledge was assessed as a possible mediator of the effects of socialization agents on children's skepticism. Demographic data (age, gender, type of school, socioeconomic status, number of children, birth order, amount of allowance, and source of the money) were also investigated as possible covariates of skepticism toward television advertising. Two studies were conducted with children from 8 to 12 years old and their parents. In Study 1 participants were 221 children, and in Study 2 participants were 662 children and 251 parents. The results shown evidence of increasing skepticism toward advertising in children from 8 to 12 years of age. A significant relationship was found between television viewing behavior and children's skepticism toward television advertising. To our knowledge this is the first study of children's skepticism toward advertising conducted in Mexico.
Keywords:
Children Skepticism; Television Advertising; Influences of Socialization; Parents Skepticism
Degree Program:
Doctoral Program in Management
Advisors:
Dr. Wayne D. Hoyer
Committee Member / Sinodal:
Dr. Robert A. Peterson; Dr. Carlos R. Martinez; Dr. Alejandro Ibarra Yunez
Degree Level:
Doctor in Philosophy in Management
School:
EGADE Business School
Campus Program:
Campus Monterrey
Discipline:
Negocios y Economía / Business & Economics
Appears in Collections:
Ciencias Sociales

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorDr. Wayne D. Hoyeren
dc.creatorGonzález García, Silviaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-17T11:36:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-17T11:36:23Zen
dc.date.issued2004-08-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11285/572606en
dc.description.abstractThe aims of this work were to explore whether children exhibit skepticism toward televsion advertising and to examine the possible influence of socialization agents such as family, peers, and media on children's skepticism toward television advertising using socialization theory as a framework. Skepticism was defined as a tendency to disbelieve advertising claims. Advertising skepticism was conceptualized as an outcome of a socialization process. Specifically, the study investigated whether children from 8 to 12 years of age exhibit skepticism toward advertisng. Additionally, parents' skepticism, the type of family communication (socio-oriented versus concept-oriented communication), children's susceptibility to peer influence (susceptibility to informational versus normative peer influence), and the extent of television viewing were investigated regarding the relationship to children's skepticism toward television advertising. In order to shed light on the relationship among these variables, children's market knowledge was assessed as a possible mediator of the effects of socialization agents on children's skepticism. Demographic data (age, gender, type of school, socioeconomic status, number of children, birth order, amount of allowance, and source of the money) were also investigated as possible covariates of skepticism toward television advertising. Two studies were conducted with children from 8 to 12 years old and their parents. In Study 1 participants were 221 children, and in Study 2 participants were 662 children and 251 parents. The results shown evidence of increasing skepticism toward advertising in children from 8 to 12 years of age. A significant relationship was found between television viewing behavior and children's skepticism toward television advertising. To our knowledge this is the first study of children's skepticism toward advertising conducted in Mexico.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleChildrení Skepticism Toward Television Advertising-Edición Únicaen
dc.typeTesis de Doctoradoes
thesis.degree.grantorInstituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterreyes
thesis.degree.levelDoctor in Philosophy in Managementen
dc.contributor.committeememberDr. Robert A. Petersones
dc.contributor.committeememberDr. Carlos R. Martinezes
dc.contributor.committeememberDr. Alejandro Ibarra Yunezes
thesis.degree.disciplineEGADE Business Schoolen
thesis.degree.nameDoctoral Program in Managementen
dc.subject.keywordChildren Skepticismen
dc.subject.keywordTelevision Advertisingen
dc.subject.keywordInfluences of Socializationen
dc.subject.keywordParents Skepticismen
thesis.degree.programCampus Monterreyen
dc.subject.disciplineNegocios y Economía / Business & Economicsen
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